CQC CITATIONS

CQC inspection reports that cite us. CQC regularly cite us in their inspection reports of our customers and we’re also cited by the Scottish Care Inspectorate. The following are all extracts from CQC and Scottish Care Inspectorate reports as a result of inspections performed at care homes where Mobile Care Monitoring is being used.

The Raikes Residential Home, Crabree Care Homes

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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We saw the service used an electronic system to record care plans, risk assessments and other records relating to people’s care and treatment. We saw all the staff on duty had a hand held devise with their own unique log on which was used to record all activities throughout their shift. This meant any changes in people’s care and treatment were recorded as they happened, which ensured the information available to staff was accurate and up to date. In addition, if a person needed to go into hospital staff were able to log onto the system and print off a hospital pack to go with them. This ensured the hospital staff received all the essential information they required.

We saw the registered manager and the office administrator carried out a range of meaningful audits to include care plans, medication, infection control, staff training and supervision, environmental and accidents and incidents. We saw where shortfalls in the service had been identified action had been taken quickly to address the concerns and a lesson learnt exercise carried out to reduce the risk of a similar incident occurring again. The registered manager was also able to quickly review the care, treatment and support people received on a daily basis due to the ‘live’ electronic care record system.

Lansbury Court Nursing Home, Indigo Care Services

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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We found risks to people were entered on the electronic care recording system and reviewed regularly with control measures put into place to mitigate against any assessed risks. Staff had access to these via smart phones. This meant staff had up to date information and guidance to keep people safe when carrying out support. One care worker told us, “We can log on and see if there have been any changes with people’s risk assessments if we need to.”

Where people were assessed as requiring their food and fluid intake recording we found staff recorded this using their smart phones. We observed this information was uploaded to the electronic care record so the information was available to any staff member accessing the records. The manager told us, “The amount of food and fluid is seen on a tab on the person’s record so there is quick reference to what they have had that day.” We reviewed some records and found these were completed regularly.

Grange Lea Residential Care Home, Orange Care

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Since they were last inspected, Grange-Lea had introduced an electronic mobile care monitoring system, person centred software. All care plans were held electronically and staff had individual hand held devices to record all aspects of care. This allowed staff to record care as it was given and alerted the registered manager and staff of any care needs that were required, such as a person requiring their position changing or how much food and fluid they had during that day.

People’s care plans were based on their initial assessment, and were comprehensive and detailed, providing staff with relevant and appropriate guidance in how to support each person. There was personal information in people’s care plans describing how the person wanted to spend their time, their likes and dislikes and other preferences. For example, one person liked to have all their drinks in a plastic beaker with two handles as they found this lighter and easier for them to hold. This was put into their care plan so that staff would know this was important for them. Another care plan told staff that a person liked to eat their breakfast in their room looking at the view of the sea. This meant that people received care that was totally individualised, person centred and based on how they wanted to be treated and looked after.

With the introduction of the electronic care planning system, the registered manager was able to ensure that every aspect of people’s care was assessed, reviewed and evaluated on a daily basis. There were systems in place to review the quality of service in the home. Monthly audits were carried out to monitor areas such as care plans, accidents and incidents, and medication. Monthly development plans, based on quality assurance and observations, were completed to drive improvement.

Bentley House, Signature

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Support plans were kept electronically and automatically updated when staff recorded on their handheld devices the support people received.

Penns Mount Residential Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Electronic care records showed the times each task was completed. A relative told us, “Being reassured that Mum is well cared for by the right number of staff who are genuinely interested in the residents is very important to me”.

Timaru, Liaise Loddon

Rating: Good
Date: September 2017

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‘The provider had robust systems in place for maintaining accurate records. Staff used a hand held device to record people’s daily care and activities and this was then uploaded onto an electronic system. This enabled the registered manager and senior staff to monitor people’s progress or any concerns and produce detailed reports as and when they needed them. We viewed a number of reports during the inspection and found the information to be detailed and up to date. A relative told us “The documentation is very good. The attention to detail, the depth and volume of the paperwork they keep for [my family member]…it’s so important, especially with challenging behaviour. I’m delighted with the way they are looking after him.”‘

‘The registered manager told us relatives could access the ‘Relative’s Gateway’ (an online system), with a unique password which gave them access to family member’s records if they wished to do so. This included activities, achievements and photos. Relatives confirmed they had access to this and felt involved and kept informed of their loved one’s progress. One relative told us “We always attend reviews and are involved in care planning. They keep us informed of what’s happening.”‘

 

Sunningdale House, South West Care Homes

Rating: Good
Date: September 2017

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‘The electronic recording system that staff used highlighted to the registered manager if a particular incident of concern had occurred to a person using the service. For example if a person had a fall or appeared to be anxious, this would be flagged on the computer system. The registered manager would then be notified of this immediately and would be able to respond appropriately to the situation. This meant that people received prompt responses when an incident occurred.’

 

Coghlan Lodges Limited

Rating: Good
Date: September 2017

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‘Details were recorded on an electronic care plan system so that if any staff were unable to be present or wanted to check details, this was available throughout the shift.’

‘Staff knew how to keep people’s information confidential. The electronic systems used were all password protected.’

‘There was a hospital section which could be downloaded so that it could be taken to hospital with the person. People’s care plans were held on an electronic care system. This was accessed by staff through a hand held device and or a laptop. Staff told us they regularly used care plans to understand people’s needs and that these care plans were regularly updated. One staff member commented on the system, “The system is really good, is easy to get up to date information about a person”. We saw regular reviews of care plans were in place to ensure people’s needs were still being met. Particular needs were recorded on the electronic care system. The system would automatically ‘flag’ up when a particular activity had not been completed. For example, medicine administration or when a care plan review was due. This system was reviewed by the registered manager and senior staff to enable them to monitor people’s care. If any anomalies arose, the registered manager or senior staff would investigate.’

WCS Care Westlands

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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The provider was innovative and creative and strived to improve the quality of people’s lives. They had researched and reflected on how an internationally recognised provider of excellence in dementia care provided care. They had implemented an electronic care planning system that ensured staff and management had access to the most up-to-date information at the press of a button and enabled relatives to be fully informed and involved in their relations’ care.

The provider had recently implemented an electronic care planning tool, which was designed to facilitate staff’s record keeping and monitoring of the quality of the service people received. All staff had hand-held mobile devices so they had instant access to people’s care plans and individual risks at the touch of a screen. Staff told us they liked the new system. An electronic alert sent directly to staff’s handheld devices ensured staff were reminded to take time-critical actions related to people’s health. For example, actions by staff to minimise risks related to specific-time medicines administration, poor food or fluid intake and risks of skin becoming sore or damaged.

The system prompted staff to make sure checks had been carried out for people who stayed in their rooms, as identified in their care plan. Duty managers monitored the quality of the service through the same electronic care planning system, which showed a red flag if specified, planned care interventions were ‘late’. A service manager told us, “Any omissions, ‘late or asleep’ records are red flagged. At our three daily handover meetings, staff check the red flagged ‘hotlist’ and decide on actions needed. There is a footnote facility to explain why items on the hotlist are closed.” The electronic care planning system enable the management team to monitor if people were not weighed regularly, did not eat well, or if their weight or fluid intake dropped out of an appropriate range for their height, age and health condition. The provider was able to demonstrate that people had benefited from the electronic monitoring system. For example, by constantly monitoring how much people drank, staff had been able to encourage people to drink the right amount for their height and weight. Management reports showed that staff at Westlands had successfully encouraged 94% of people to drink at least their target amount during April 2017, which reduced the risk of people becoming dehydrated or of developing infections.

The provider’s operations team monitored management reports across the group of homes three times a day, seven days a week and sent reminders to all the registered managers requesting explanations for any gaps or omissions compared to people’s care plans. All the information staff entered on the system was instantly available to the duty manager, which meant they were able to continuously check that people received the care they needed. We saw the system required staff to record details such as the person’s response to care and support, their moods and appetites and how much they drank. The system supported the registered manager’s monthly audits of people’s medicines, complaints, accident and incident records and housekeeping records. The ultimate goal of the electronic care planning system is the ability to monitor whether staff take the agreed actions that are critical to a person’s health or wellbeing.

The electronic care planning system provided a new opportunity for relatives to stay fully informed and involved in their relations care if they were unable to visit regularly. Relatives had a password protected access to an on-line ‘gateway’ into their relation’s care plan and daily records. Relatives were able to talk to staff through an associated messaging service, so were able to obtain immediate reassurance from staff if they had any concerns about their relation’s care, support or health.

Bowburn Care Centre

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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The provider had an electronic quality monitoring system in place. The registered manager entered information on the system including accidents and incidents, details of the people who used the service including monitoring of their weights, and a range of monthly audits. The provider used this system to generate reports, request updates and results of investigations from the registered manager, and as a monitoring tool for quality monitoring visits to the home by the provider.

How it works

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