CQC CITATIONS

CQC inspection reports that cite us. CQC regularly cite us in their inspection reports of our customers and we’re also cited by the Scottish Care Inspectorate. The following are all extracts from CQC and Scottish Care Inspectorate reports as a result of inspections performed at care homes where Mobile Care Monitoring is being used.

Keychange Charity Romans Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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Care staff recorded when they attended to people through the use of an electronic system where staff recorded any care interventions that took place throughout the day and night. For example, interventions such as when people required turning to protect their skin integrity, fluid intake and output, hygiene, blood pressure, blood sugar and night checks, without having to fill in any additional paperwork.

Relatives would be able to view their family member’s care plans within the new format as soon as the new system had bedded in.

St Anne’s Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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The provider was trialling a new online remote care plan recording system on one of the floors. A staff member showed us how they could immediately record care needs using a handheld device and that this made it far quicker to record at the times of the day they had carried out care tasks. They could also record interactions and events for people. Although this system was in its early stages of use there was a good degree of confidence from both staff and the provider that this would make the recording of care more efficient. Care provided to people could also be clearly linked to the member of staff providing the care as each had their own log in to the handheld devices.

Brierfield Residential Home

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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There were systems in place which showed that the service continued to improve. This included the recent installation of a computerised care recording system. These were hand held devices used by staff to input the care and support people had been provided with and their wellbeing. These allowed information to be recorded immediately and allowed the staff to spend more time with people.

Barton Court

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

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The provider had recently invested in a bespoke computerised care planning system. Each member of care staff carried a smart device which gave them access to the care plans from anywhere in the home. The system also tracked when care was due, when it had had been delivered, what care had taken place and enabled staff complete their log of care directly into the smart technology. This enabled management to monitor care delivery in real time and respond to any deficiencies.

 

Sefton Hall

Rating: Outstanding
Date: August 2017

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‘Care plans contained specialist assessments, for example, a tool to assess possible pain in people who would not be able to communicate this verbally. The care planning system was also able to generate a ‘hospital pack’ that could be printed off in an emergency to go with a person to hospital. Records clearly specified people’s views where known in relation to their wishes in case of a sudden deteriorating in their health.’

‘We saw recorded assessments which demonstrated that a thorough process had taken place. The assessment gathered information about people’s immediate¬†and longer term health needs. The assessment identified what equipment and involvement would be needed to support them, the person’s social needs and degree of family involvement, the person’s likes, dislikes, preferences, wishes and aspirations. All of this information helped to formulate extensive and very relevant care plans. These continued to evolve as some people got more involved in their care planning or staff got to know the person better. The care planning was centred on what the person thought and wanted making them very personalised. Care plans were constantly reviewed and updated and where possible they involved the person themselves. Staff and visiting professionals, therefore, had access to fully up to date information on people’s care and their needs which helped people receive safe and appropriate care.’

The Old Rectory Nursing Home

Rating: Outstanding
Date: August 2017

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‘Catering staff told us, “We have a special diet and allergies list plus people’s likes and dislikes. All food that is eaten is documented on the care plan electronic tablet, that applies to food and fluids. We also have a list of food and fluids that can interact with certain drugs. If someone’s diet changes we are informed, we have very good communications.’

‘The computer system allowed alerts to notify staff if someone needed to be ready for an activity they liked or were going out.’

‘People’s records showed contemporaneous records of the care provided by staff and staff were observed throughout the day updating records. Staff used a comprehensive computer care planning programme and updated care records using electronic tablets… Care plans included routines and preferences and there were separate care plans for day and night routines. An example of preferences include what the person’s usual routine was, any likes or dislikes and what was important to them.’

‘There was excellent communication about people’s needs with staff signing electronic shift handovers covering the previous 72 hours.’

‘It was important to the service to promote a ‘family feel’. This meant that people and their relatives and friends were very involved in the running of the home. For example, as well as regular newsletters and residents, family and friends meetings, promotion of the use of IT for communication with distant relatives.’

The Grange

Rating: Good
Date: June 2017

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Investment in an electronic records system provided the facility for the registered manager and the registered provider to have greater oversight and scrutiny of day to day care delivery, even remotely when not on site. This enabled the registered manager and provider to check at any time of day or night, the support provided to people, the administration of their medicines, food and fluid intake, personal care routines supported and activities participated in. This provided them with greater assurance that all aspects of the service were meeting requirements consistently and systems in place were being carried out as per their own policies and procedures.

The new electronic system enabled the provider and registered manager to scrutinise how many people were participating in what types of activity on any given day; they could identify where there were gaps in available activities or where particular individuals were at risk of becoming isolated through non participation and could take action to address this.

Battersea Place Retirement Village Limited

Rating: Good
Date: June 2017

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The provider utilised an electronic care plan system and each healthcare assistant was issued with a smartphone which they used to clock in and out, and checked off their tasks every time they visited a person to support them. This system allowed the managers to have an overview of when visits were carried out and if healthcare assistants attended visits on time. It also provided them with real-time information about the personal care tasks that had been provided at any particular time.

Healthcare assistants scanned their smartphones when they entered and left a flat to carry out personal care. This uploaded data onto the care plan system so the registered manager was able to view real time information about when people had been supported. The system also allowed for alerts to notify if a visit was late or had been missed.

The system was automated so when clinical staff completed a risk assessment, if the data inputted indicated a high risk there was an associated care plan in place to manage the risk. For example, one person had been identified as being at high risk following a waterlow risk assessment and they had an appropriate skin integrity care plan in place to manage the risk of developing pressure sores.

Observations such as temperature, pulse, blood pressure, blood oxygen, respiration and weight were recorded and could be analysed for any changes easily as they were presented electronically in a graphical format.

The provider used an electronic, paperless care planning system with a mobile application that was used by the healthcare assistants. Care records were created, updated and maintained electronically. The front page of each record had a summary and a checklist and the time of when personal care tasks had last been completed. This provided a visual confirmation of the last time that people had been supported.

The electronic care plan system was able to generate a hospital passport if needed. The aim of the hospital passport is to provide hospital staff with important information about people and their health when they are admitted to hospital. Any relevant notes such as therapy or GP reports were scanned into the system.

Balgowan Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: May 2017

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Provider had recently introduced a new electronic care plan software, which the registered manager told us had been very effective and enables staff to respond to people’s needs. Staff said, “If care is missed the device will flag this up. This is been effective for escalating health issues like vital signs and any missed two hourly turns and supplements of fluids”. Each person had an up to date care plan which set out for staff how their needs should be met. Care plans contained information about people’s likes, dislikes, allergies and their preferences for how care and support was provided.

The Downes Residential Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: June 2017

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Staff had individual electronic tablets to record any interventions. Observation of the system demonstrated staff were familiar with the system. A staff member told us, “It’s a very good system because we record things at the time of the event rather than waiting to write it up at the end of the shift, when we might forget something.” The registered manager showed us how they were alerted when care had not been provided as required. This meant the service was responding to people’s needs when they needed the support.

How it works

Find out more about how Mobile Care Monitoring works.

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Links Lodge

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The impact of using Mobile Care Monitoring in care homes.

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