CQC CITATIONS

CQC inspection reports that cite us. CQC regularly cite us in their inspection reports of our customers and we’re also cited by the Scottish Care Inspectorate. The following are all extracts from CQC and Scottish Care Inspectorate reports as a result of inspections performed at care homes where Mobile Care Monitoring is being used.

Merrifield House Residential Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: June 2017

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There was an electronic records system in place which ensured that all aspects of people’s care was kept up to date which enabled the registered manager to monitor people’s general health and well-being and keep them safe.

Greenacres Care Centre Ltd

Rating: Good
Date: July 2017

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People’s care records were held electronically and covered a range of information relating to people’s health and social care needs. For example they contained information to assist staff to provide care in a manner that respected people wishes. Staff held individual electronic monitors to add any information at any time to people’s personal care records. This helped to ensure care records were always updated and staff were able to respond appropriately. All the staff we spoke to were familiar with people’s needs and said information and guidelines were clear and easy to access. Care plans were personalised and included information about how people chose and preferred to be supported.

WCS Care, Drovers House

Rating: Outstanding
Date: July 2017

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‘The provider had researched national and international best practice measures and adopted innovative technologies to improve how people’s care was delivered, monitored and adapted to meet their changing needs.’

‘The provider was innovative and creative and constantly strived to improve the quality of people’s lives. The provider had researched and reflected on how an internationally recognised provider of excellence in dementia care provided care. They had implemented technological systems that […] ensured staff and management had access to the most up-to-date information at the press of a button and enabled relatives to be fully informed and involved in their relations’ care. People benefited from the technology because staff had more time to care for them.’

‘All the information in the care plans was available to staff electronically in hand-held devices they carried with them. A member of staff told us, “I have all the information I need, the care plan, contact details and medical information.” The management team used the risk assessments, care plans and their knowledge of people’s dependencies, to calculate the number of staff needed to support people according to their individual needs.’

‘The electronic care planning system raised a red alert to the management team if people were not weighed regularly, or did not eat well, or if their weight dropped out of an appropriate range for their height, age and health condition.’

‘A member of staff told us that all the information was available to them on a handheld electronic device and they were able to tell us, within seconds of accessing the device, which language one person had spoken as a child. Another member of staff told us, “I learnt about their history and now understand (them).”‘

‘The provider had transferred people’s care plans from paper to electronic records and all staff had handheld mobile devices so they had access to all the information they needed at the touch of a screen. Staff told us they really liked the new system as they no longer needed to spend time writing up daily records by hand. Every time they supported an individual, as agreed in their care plan, they were able to click a button to say ‘completed’. Each person’s electronic care plan included ten ‘must do’s, which were used to make sure time-critical actions were taken by staff. For example, actions by staff to minimise risks related to specific time medicines administration, poor food or fluid intake, risks of skin becoming sore or damaged and checks of people who stayed in their rooms were always relevant to the individual risks identified in their care plan.’

‘The electronic care planning system provided a new opportunity for relatives to stay fully informed and involved in their relations care. Relatives had a password protected access to an on-line ‘gateway’ into their relation’s care plan and daily records. Relatives were able to talk to staff through an associated messaging service, so were able to obtain immediate reassurance from staff if they had any concerns about their relation’s care, support or health. Relatives were able to ask staff to include specific actions into the person’s 10 daily ‘must do’ actions.’

‘Staff told us, “This is better” and “Whenever an intervention happens, we record it – where, how much, happy or unhappy, activities, mobility, in or out of bed” and “I can add ‘must dos’ for the next day, for example, blood sugar and insulin to be checked by district nurse.” We saw the system required staff to record details, such as the person’s response to care and support, their moods and appetites and how much they drank. All the information staff entered was instantly available to the duty manager, which meant they were able to continuously check that people received the care they needed.’

‘The electronic care system sent alerts to staff and managers when specific care actions were due, and showed a red flag if they were ‘late’. A member of staff told us, “The duty manager will come up or phone up very promptly to find out why anything is red.” The duty managers monitored the quality of the service through the same electronic care planning system and through monthly audits of people’s medicines, complaints, accident and incident records and housekeeping records. A service manager told us, “Any omissions, ‘late or asleep’ records are red flagged. At our three daily handover meetings, staff check the red flagged ‘hotlist’ and decide on actions needed. There is a footnote facility to explain why items on the hotlist are closed.”‘

 

Liaise Loddon, Sansa House

Rating: Outstanding
Date: July 2017

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‘The provider had also recently installed person centred software (PCS) which was linked to the electronic devices staff used to record people’s daily notes. This system also provided alerts when required, for example; to remind staff if people had initially declined their medicines. This innovative system enabled relatives to see what their loved one was doing at any given time through a ‘relative’s portal’. Clearly visible icons displayed people’s moods so people authorised to visit their records could see at a glance how they were feeling. The relative’s portal also had a gallery of photographs showing people enjoying themselves completing different activities.’

‘Relatives provided positive feedback about the development of PCS. One person told us, “One of the strengths of this service has always been the joined up communication between relatives and the staff. They have always been excellent at providing important information, keeping us involved and updated. This new development again shows why they are always trying to make things even better.”‘

‘We observed one person decline their morning medicine and staff demonstrated how the electronic recording system reminded them to administer the medicine later. The person administering also set another alert to ensure the person did receive their medicines as prescribed. People were supported to take their medicines safely.’

‘We spoke with the provider’s positive support director who told us they were improving the capability of the PCS and in the next phase were going to include people’s care plans and risk assessments so authorised people, including relatives and advocates where appropriate, would be able to access live documents. The provider used innovative and inclusive methods to ensure people and those that mattered to them had information available to them when they needed it.’

‘Staff demonstrated how the PCS technology enabled people’s relatives, who could be on the other side of the world, to review this incident, the action taken by staff and the person’s recovery as it was recorded.’

Oakhaven Residential Care Home

Rating: Outstanding
Date: May 2017

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“People’s care records described the way in which they wished to be supported. These had been transcribed onto a new electronic format which staff accessed using mobile telephones issued by the provider. These had security log in codes and were stored in the home. Staff described how effective these were to use whereby they were able to update care records as they provided care and support. Another advantage was the responsiveness to changes in people’s care needs instantly updating care records. For example, a person had seen their GP and due to concerns about hydration they had asked staff to monitor their fluid intake. This had immediately been added to the electronic care plan and staff working around the home were immediately updated about this. If a person had not received the care and support as scheduled, the management team would be alerted and could follow this up to find out why. This meant people’s care was monitored closely to make sure they received their care and support when they needed it.”

“[Oakhaven] had recently introduced a new electronic care planning system which staff used interactively as they provided care. The impact of this was more time for staff to spend with people delivering care and support as well as staff having instant access to people’s care needs and any changes which had arisen. This also meant the response time for dealing with people’s changing needs was quicker and referrals for health care professionals could be made promptly.”

Kestrel Grove Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: January 2017

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‘One nurse described the positive aspects of the level of communication this electronic system provided, and how it keeps them fully updated on the care needs of each person. We found that all staff spoken with were positive about this system and they felt it led to a better standard of person centred care. One of the nurses we spoke with told us “I have not worked with this system before but it makes our job much more effective and improves the efficiency of our recording, which in turn has got to be better for the people who live here.”‘

‘Record keeping in the home was robust and detailed; we noted examples where daily intervention records were always completed at the time using the mobile information technology system that was in place. This meant that any information that related to the care of an individual person could be accessed in minutes and was continuously updated.’

Thornfield, Cannon Care

Rating: Outstanding
Date: November 2016

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‘A new electronic care recording system had been introduced which staff were adjusting to. At the time of our inspection, written records and electronic records were running alongside each other in order to ensure staff were competent and confident to transfer over to the new system.’

The Seaton, Southern Healthcare

Rating: Good
Date: November 2016

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‘The provider had recently introduced a new system for staff to record all care activities on their own data protected individual i-pads. This was proving to be a very effective way to monitor the delivery of care. For example, the amount of fluids, when a person had been assisted to be moved , and what activities they had taken part in could all be easily monitored on the system . Trends were spotted by the recording system as well. For example, falls people may experience and the times they happened could all be easily seen on the electronic system.’

Tilsley House Care Home, Solomon Care

Rating: Good
Date: September 2016

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‘Tilsley House had previously used written care files, had changed to one electronic system of recording , and then changed to another. The registered manager explained that since they had begun to use the current system, records had improved.  This was because staff recorded events such as, incidents, re-positioning, food and fluid intake straight away without waiting to hand write in care files. Staff told us the system was “great” and “a real benefit as you can record yourself and it will write for you if your English isn’t great – like mine!” The care files on the system contained information about people’s individual medical needs, together with evidence of on- going monitoring and involvement from a range of health professionals, such as GPs, district nurses and other specialists to ensure their well-being was promoted. We saw regular evaluations of people’s support, together with updates and details where changes in their health status had been noted. We found people’s files were organised well to enable information to be easily found.’

Allenbrook Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: September 2016

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‘Care plans were person centred and contained guidance about people’s personal preferences for how they liked to be supported. For example, one care plan explained how the person liked to be assisted in the community. Another care plan explained how to support a person who needed to be prompted with personal care. Each member of staff had an electronic data terminal that carried people’s individual care plans and daily records. Staff were able to access peoples care records immediately without the need to visit the office and update them as things happened. This ensured that peoples care records were up to date and current.’

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Links Lodge

Links Lodge provide Outstanding care with Mobile Care Monitoring.

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The impact of using Mobile Care Monitoring in care homes.

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