Have you seen our #GladtoCare Competition yet? Click here to find out more...

INSPECTION CITATIONS

Care Quality Commission (CQC), the Care Inspectorate in Scotland and Care Inspectorate Wales (CIW) regularly cite us in their inspection reports of our customers. The following are all extracts from CQC, the Care Inspectorate and CIW reports as a result of inspections performed at care homes where Mobile Care Monitoring is being used.

St Anne’s Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: August 2017

READ CQC REPORT

The provider was trialling a new online remote care plan recording system on one of the floors. A staff member showed us how they could immediately record care needs using a handheld device and that this made it far quicker to record at the times of the day they had carried out care tasks. They could also record interactions and events for people. Although this system was in its early stages of use there was a good degree of confidence from both staff and the provider that this would make the recording of care more efficient. Care provided to people could also be clearly linked to the member of staff providing the care as each had their own log in to the handheld devices.

Newfield Lodge, Ideal Carehomes

Rating: Good
Date: April 2017

READ CQC REPORT

Each staff member had an i-pod which allowed them to access people’s records only accessed via a password. These included care plans for personal care, safety and the environment, nutrition, activities, communication, continence needs, mobility, medication, emotional support and sleeping patterns. Staff were also able to access the handover notes for each shift and add to them if a GP had been called, for example and could also log any concerns raised by a person or their family. As staff had the i-pod with them they were able to refer instantly to the records which meant it was better for the person as they could remain with them while checking their records.

Care records resulted from the initial assessment and were person-centred. They included all key aspects of a person’s needs such as communication, lifestyle preferences, emotional support needs, mobility, nutrition skin integrity and medication. Each assessment discussed the present situation for a person, what their needs were and how these were to be met with very specific guidance for staff. The level of support required for people was highlighted according to the activity or decision they were undertaking. In one care record we saw ‘[Name] can communicate their needs but gets confused when people ask them questions. They may need more assistance making choices that are in their best interest…They sometimes find it easier to make decisions if given a choice of two or more.’ On each assessed need the person’s risk assessment scores were noted helping staff to see instantly how other aspects of their abilities may impact on their care need.

Kestrel Grove Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: January 2017

READ CQC REPORT

‘One nurse described the positive aspects of the level of communication this electronic system provided, and how it keeps them fully updated on the care needs of each person. We found that all staff spoken with were positive about this system and they felt it led to a better standard of person centred care. One of the nurses we spoke with told us “I have not worked with this system before but it makes our job much more effective and improves the efficiency of our recording, which in turn has got to be better for the people who live here.”‘

‘Record keeping in the home was robust and detailed; we noted examples where daily intervention records were always completed at the time using the mobile information technology system that was in place. This meant that any information that related to the care of an individual person could be accessed in minutes and was continuously updated.’

The Seaton, Southern Healthcare

Rating: Good
Date: November 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘The provider had recently introduced a new system for staff to record all care activities on their own data protected individual i-pads. This was proving to be a very effective way to monitor the delivery of care. For example, the amount of fluids, when a person had been assisted to be moved , and what activities they had taken part in could all be easily monitored on the system . Trends were spotted by the recording system as well. For example, falls people may experience and the times they happened could all be easily seen on the electronic system.’

Allenbrook Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: September 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘Care plans were person centred and contained guidance about people’s personal preferences for how they liked to be supported. For example, one care plan explained how the person liked to be assisted in the community. Another care plan explained how to support a person who needed to be prompted with personal care. Each member of staff had an electronic data terminal that carried people’s individual care plans and daily records. Staff were able to access peoples care records immediately without the need to visit the office and update them as things happened. This ensured that peoples care records were up to date and current.’

Tilsley House Care Home, Solomon Care

Rating: Good
Date: September 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘Tilsley House had previously used written care files, had changed to one electronic system of recording , and then changed to another. The registered manager explained that since they had begun to use the current system, records had improved.  This was because staff recorded events such as, incidents, re-positioning, food and fluid intake straight away without waiting to hand write in care files. Staff told us the system was “great” and “a real benefit as you can record yourself and it will write for you if your English isn’t great – like mine!” The care files on the system contained information about people’s individual medical needs, together with evidence of on- going monitoring and involvement from a range of health professionals, such as GPs, district nurses and other specialists to ensure their well-being was promoted. We saw regular evaluations of people’s support, together with updates and details where changes in their health status had been noted. We found people’s files were organised well to enable information to be easily found.’

Coloma Court, Healthcare Management Trust

Rating: Good
Date: August 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘Care and health assessments were undertaken to identify people’s support needs when they moved into the home. The home had introduced a computer based care planning system in July 2015. A unit manager told us that care plans and risk assessments were developed using the assessment information. Care plans included detailed information and guidance for staff on how people’s needs should be met. They described people’s daily living activities, their life history, personal preferences, their communication methods, mobility needs and the support they required with personal and nursing care. We saw that people’s care records were constantly updated throughout the day by health care assistants using iPod’s and nursing staff using iPad’s. For example health care assistants recorded what people ate and drank or if there were any changes in their needs or behaviours that might require medical assistance and unit managers recorded the outcome of appointments with and referrals made to health care professionals.’

‘Most of the information relating to peoples care and support needs were held on the computer system however some paper records were held in individual care files, for example capacity assessments and, where appropriate, Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards authorisations and associated paperwork. The unit manager told us, “The care planning system is easy to use, easy to update and it’s easy to keep people’s needs under review. Staff have more time to spend time with the residents because they are not having to complete lots of paperwork.” A health care assistant told us, “We are all familiar with people’s needs because we read their care plans and assessments. Using the iPod during the day also helps us keep up to date with what people need.” Information contained in the care files indicated that people using the service, their relatives and appropriate healthcare professionals had been involved in the care planning process.’

Oaklands Rest Home

Rating: Good
Date: July 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘Staff acknowledged that they had read and understood the information passed at handover by recording this using the provider’s electronic care planning system. This ensured the consistency of care for people was maintained and any new concerns or issues relating to peoples welfare were recorded and passed on.’

South Lodge, Signature Care Homes

Rating: Good
Date: July 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘There were targets identified for each person and daily amounts were totalled automatically when staff recorded the information within the electronic care plan. We spoke with the registered manager about this who said the electronic care plan had been introduced to the entire home. The system now alerted staff when people had not had adequate fluids, and staff could take steps to alleviate the situation.’

Cornfields, Liaise Loddon

Rating: Good
Date: April 2016

READ CQC REPORT

‘They told us there was a handover at the beginning of each shift where the incoming staff team was updated on any relevant information. We reviewed the morning handover on the day of our inspection which had been recorded electronically. We saw detailed information provided about people’s health and different moods, together with the potential risks and impact on planned daily activities.’

How it works

Find out more about how Mobile Care Monitoring works.

READ MORE

Links Lodge

Links Lodge provide Outstanding care with Mobile Care Monitoring.

READ MORE

Success stories

The impact of using Mobile Care Monitoring in care homes.

READ MORE

Ask Us Anything

From basic questions to complex queries. We're always ready to talk to you.
Give us a call 01483 604108 or drop us a line in the contact form