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CQC CITATIONS

CQC inspection reports that cite us. CQC regularly cite us in their inspection reports of our customers and we’re also cited by the Scottish Care Inspectorate. The following are all extracts from CQC and Scottish Care Inspectorate reports as a result of inspections performed at care homes where Mobile Care Monitoring is being used.

The Kathleen Rutland Home, Vista Homes

Rating: Good
Date: March 2016

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‘People’s information was being kept secure. Staff carried small electronic devises for storing information such as when personal care had been offered and carried out. The provider was looking to replace paper files with these electronic records. These devices were password protected and when not in use were locked in the manager’s office.’

Thornfield, Cannon Care

Rating: Outstanding
Date: November 2016

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‘A new electronic care recording system had been introduced which staff were adjusting to. At the time of our inspection, written records and electronic records were running alongside each other in order to ensure staff were competent and confident to transfer over to the new system.’

Lifstan Way Care Home, RG Care

Rating: Good
Date: January 2016

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‘New online person centred care plans allowed care workers to spend more quality time with people.’

‘Health professionals had access to the service’s new Person Centred Software which enabled them to contribute effectively to people’s care and support plans.’

‘The implementation of the new person centred software has improved the services potential ability to audit and improve the quality of care being given.’

‘Care records clearly showed people had access to healthcare professionals when required. People told us that they liaised with their GP, mental health professionals, dentists and optometrists in the community when required. One person said, “I haven’t been feeling well so they [staff] have made an appointment for me with the doctor.” We saw one person being supported by staff to attend their health care appointment. The new online person centred software also had the capability to allow GP’s and other appropriate professionals temporary access (and view only) of an individual’s care records in their own offices in order to contribute effectively to peoples care with current information.’

Mallands Residential Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: May 2015

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‘On our second visit we looked at a care monitoring and recording system that the home had installed. This meant that entries were completed by staff onto a mobile handheld electronic recording system throughout the day each time they had an interaction with a person at the home. This then automatically informed the manager and other staff on duty for example if a person had not had fluids or food at the optimum level within a two hour period, and gave print outs of the overall food or fluid intake for the person for the day. This helped ensure that staff had a high awareness of monitoring food and fluid consumption for people at potential risk of poor hydration or nutrition. Staff we spoke with told us the system worked well as it was completed while they were with the person rather than having to remember to complete paper records later about food or fluids taken.’

Cameron Park Nursing Home

Rating: Good
Date: March 2016

Cameron Park Care Home are based in Edinburgh and were inspected by the Scottish Care Inspectorate

‘A major change had taken place in how care records were kept. The home had moved to electronic records. Each staff member had a handset the size of a smart phone. This gave them accessible and up to date information about each residents’ plan of care. Staff recorded care via the handset which meant that records were up to date. The care records we looked at were fully completed with relevant care information, tailored to each individual’s care needs and preferences.’

‘The new electronic records provided an easy way for the manager and staff to monitor the quality of care. For example, care records were used to see how often residents were receiving a bath or shower and check whether this met their preference. The sample of records we checked showed that residents received regular baths or showers. Some residents we asked said staff asked them about their preference each day.’

‘Introduction of the electronic care planning system had taken place in a phased way. Staff had received training and were able to try the system out before it was implemented. The transition had been successful and staff said the system was easy to use and a great way to record and access care plans easily. We saw that care records were updated instantly and the new system provided individualised and personalised records on all aspects of care and support. Additionally this system of record keeping provided a good overview for the manager and staff in charge to ensure care was carried out in a way that followed best practice.’

Penns Mount Residential Care Home

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Electronic care records showed the times each task was completed. A relative told us, “Being reassured that Mum is well cared for by the right number of staff who are genuinely interested in the residents is very important to me”.

Bentley House, Signature

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Support plans were kept electronically and automatically updated when staff recorded on their handheld devices the support people received.

Grange Lea Residential Care Home, Orange Care

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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Since they were last inspected, Grange-Lea had introduced an electronic mobile care monitoring system, person centred software. All care plans were held electronically and staff had individual hand held devices to record all aspects of care. This allowed staff to record care as it was given and alerted the registered manager and staff of any care needs that were required, such as a person requiring their position changing or how much food and fluid they had during that day.

People’s care plans were based on their initial assessment, and were comprehensive and detailed, providing staff with relevant and appropriate guidance in how to support each person. There was personal information in people’s care plans describing how the person wanted to spend their time, their likes and dislikes and other preferences. For example, one person liked to have all their drinks in a plastic beaker with two handles as they found this lighter and easier for them to hold. This was put into their care plan so that staff would know this was important for them. Another care plan told staff that a person liked to eat their breakfast in their room looking at the view of the sea. This meant that people received care that was totally individualised, person centred and based on how they wanted to be treated and looked after.

With the introduction of the electronic care planning system, the registered manager was able to ensure that every aspect of people’s care was assessed, reviewed and evaluated on a daily basis. There were systems in place to review the quality of service in the home. Monthly audits were carried out to monitor areas such as care plans, accidents and incidents, and medication. Monthly development plans, based on quality assurance and observations, were completed to drive improvement.

Lansbury Court Nursing Home, Indigo Care Services

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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We found risks to people were entered on the electronic care recording system and reviewed regularly with control measures put into place to mitigate against any assessed risks. Staff had access to these via smart phones. This meant staff had up to date information and guidance to keep people safe when carrying out support. One care worker told us, “We can log on and see if there have been any changes with people’s risk assessments if we need to.”

Where people were assessed as requiring their food and fluid intake recording we found staff recorded this using their smart phones. We observed this information was uploaded to the electronic care record so the information was available to any staff member accessing the records. The manager told us, “The amount of food and fluid is seen on a tab on the person’s record so there is quick reference to what they have had that day.” We reviewed some records and found these were completed regularly.

The Raikes Residential Home, Crabree Care Homes

Rating: Good
Date: October 2017

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We saw the service used an electronic system to record care plans, risk assessments and other records relating to people’s care and treatment. We saw all the staff on duty had a hand held devise with their own unique log on which was used to record all activities throughout their shift. This meant any changes in people’s care and treatment were recorded as they happened, which ensured the information available to staff was accurate and up to date. In addition, if a person needed to go into hospital staff were able to log onto the system and print off a hospital pack to go with them. This ensured the hospital staff received all the essential information they required.

We saw the registered manager and the office administrator carried out a range of meaningful audits to include care plans, medication, infection control, staff training and supervision, environmental and accidents and incidents. We saw where shortfalls in the service had been identified action had been taken quickly to address the concerns and a lesson learnt exercise carried out to reduce the risk of a similar incident occurring again. The registered manager was also able to quickly review the care, treatment and support people received on a daily basis due to the ‘live’ electronic care record system.

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